There are seven species of raccoon from Alaska to Argentina.  The only raccoon encountered in Iowa is the North American Raccoon, Procyon lotor

 

WHAT DO I DO IF A RACCOON IS LIVING IN MY ATTIC?

If you have a raccoon in your attic, it is most likely a mother and her babies (kits).  Trapping and removing only the mother will leave the kits to starve to death, causing even more problems for you.  

The best way to clear your attic of raccoons is to contact a local animal removal expert.  Once removed, be sure to clean the area thoroughly and seal all possible entry points.  

Prevention is the best way to keep raccoons out of your house.  Make sure all entry points are securely covered.  

 

I SAW A RACCOON OUT DURING THE DAY.  DOES THAT MEAN IT IS SICK OR HAS RABIES?

No, a raccoon sighting during daylight does not mean they are sick.  While raccoons are considered nocturnal, they do wonder out during the day, especially female raccoons with kits (babies).  Nursing mothers may venture out during the day in search of food or water due to their extra nutritional requirements.

If the raccoon looks healthy, alert, and is moving in a coordinated and smooth manner, then it almost certainly does not have rabies.  A raccoon with rabies will be lethargic. They may be walking erratically, in circles, or falling over.  Basically, they look sick.

I FOUND A BABY RACCOON ALONE.  WHAT SHOULD I DO?

If the kit (baby) is larger (about a foot in length, minus the tail), walking steadily, and looks healthy, leave it alone.  Around this age they start to explore outside the den.

If the kit is under a foot long and is wobbly on it's feet, the mother was most likely disturbed while moving her babies to a new den.  Raccoons are very dedicated mothers and will be back to get her young.

If the kit has been in the same area for 24+ hours, is clearly injured, or is laying near a dead adult, contact Team Mojo or another licensed wildlife rehabilitator for further advice.